blog.google.com: Internet finally subsumed by Blogs

On: October 18, 2007
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About Michael Stevenson
I am a lecturer and PhD candidate in Media Studies at the University of Amsterdam. I've been a contributor to Masters of Media since 2006, though I now only post occasionally. A short list of papers and projects can be found here

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http://www.whateverbutton.com/blog    

<update> I checked the internet archive for blog.google.com and saw it used to redirect to http://www.blogger.com – why the change?</update>

It is well known that Google, which depends on every link it indexes to recommend search results, has a certain ‘vulnerability’ that blogs expose. Bloggers are professional-amateur-pointers. They publish frequently, they link a lot, and then they syndicate others’ links. Affectionately put, they give link love. But does Google love them back? (Note the URL in the screenshot below)

Blog.google.com is Google

So blog.google.com is, well, Google. Is this a Freudian glitch?

Last week I mentioned the weird relationship between blogs, Google and pingback spam, but discussion of the larger issue goes further back. The person who first put this in clear terms for me was Mary Hodder, who talked about moving from a static Web, with sites updated infrequently, toward a ‘live’ or dynamic Web. The problem for Google is that rapid linking makes their search returns erratic, most famously with Google Bombs. The search engine may do some tweaking รก la PageRank, or look to assuage the effect of blogs through the NoFollow html tag. They may try to segregate the Web by putting ‘Blogs’ here and ‘Everything Else’ here. But even that gets messy, and perhaps the problem is reaching critical mass. Maybe http://blog.google.com is trying to tell http://www.google.com something.

3 Responses to “blog.google.com: Internet finally subsumed by Blogs”
  • October 18, 2007 at 5:09 pm

    I think we can also no longer really talk about a static/dynamic web division. If blogs are being separated into the two, what is next?

  • October 28, 2007 at 8:12 pm

    [...] between (dynamic) blog posts and (static) blog pages. Michael Stevenson, who ironically noted that the internet is finally subsumed by blogs, commented that “It seems this might be because posts are syndicated (RSS) which is not the [...]

  • December 10, 2007 at 6:42 pm

    [...] of the post. Or just play with all the existing conventions and place your text in a non existing <’update’> tag. Comment Add a comment to your own blog post with the recent updates. Use it to reflect on your [...]