A Blog Meme: Zero Comments

On: February 13, 2008
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About Erik Borra
Erik Borra is assistant professor in Journalism and New Media at the University of Amsterdam.

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Via email I was notified that we were tagged by a blog meme, asking to write down sentences 6-8 from page 123 of the nearest book. Just coming home from Geert Lovink’s book presentation and thus having his book ‘Zero Comments‘ nearest, the quote is actually quite applicable:

The time spent interacting with media needs to be understood in terms of three distinctly different activities. The first involves the time needed to configure the machine, install, learn, and operate the software, and to become familiar with the tools for navigation. The second is the time spent with certain application related content such as blogs, e-mail, SMS, and iPods.

As a bonus I will add the 9th sentence too:

“Only after we have downloaded all the e-mail, checked intranets, and blogs do we enter the third activity, the flat, eternal time of pure communication – be it with humans or machines.”

That leaves me the task of tagging all masters of media individually (and making a blog meme network visualization afterwards). Finally, I can get some dinner and have a good talk.

6 Responses to “A Blog Meme: Zero Comments”
  • February 14, 2008 at 2:12 am

    Die probeert – net als destijds Michael Dukakis – wanhopig zijn imago als harde jongen op te poetsen. De Bush campagne probeert – het is een onveranderlijk doeltreffende tactiek – als slappeling neer te zetten; een kandidaat die al te gemakkelijk van mening verandert als het politiek gezien even beter uitkomt. Kerry heeft eerst de rampzalige uitspraak over de Irakoorlog voor zijn kiezen gekregen, ‘I voted for the 87 billion before I voted against it’.

    Charles Groenhuijsen over het ge-flipflop van John Kerry in “Hoera! Een Nieuwe President”. Uitgeverij Balans, Amsterdam: 2007. Pg 124

  • February 14, 2008 at 2:24 am

    According to the blog memes you are refering to, one has to write sentences 6 – 8 on page 123…….. not 124

    So here goes:

    “Terug naar 1988. De race van Democraat Michael Dukakis tegen vice-president George Bush, die zich afficheert als rechtgeaarde conservatief. Hij gaat op bezoek bij een vlaggenfabriek en pocht over de presentaties van zijn baas Ronald Reagan.”

    Charles Groenhuijsen. “Hoera! Een Nieuwe President”. Uitgeverij Balans, Amsterdam: 2007. Pg 123

  • February 14, 2008 at 3:52 am

    Sorry, typo. I corrected it in the post. Geert’s quote was from p123 already. Source checking is important indeed :p

  • February 14, 2008 at 2:43 pm


    Part 2. The idea of the modern world.
    2. Introduction.
    The first decade of the twentieth century had witnessed an attempt to synthesize elements from a range of late-nineteenth-century sources into a new art: an art that was of the new century yet could stand alongside the achievements of the classical tradition. One of the main supports of this new art had been the concept of ‘expression’. Expression took a variety of guises, but the one thing it needed was a notion of the ‘self’ of the artist, which could thus be expressed. In turn this Self had to have the attributes of authenticity.

    Harrison, Charles and Paul Wood. Art in Theory. 1900-1990. An Anthology of Changing Ideas. Blackwell Publishers: Oxford, 1994. p. 123 – 126.

  • February 21, 2008 at 4:47 pm

    ‘I give you my word of honour I’ve come from the moon, and that’s all I can tell you… all the same I’m tremendously obliged to you, you know, tremendously. I hope that my manner hasn’t in any way given you offence.’

    H.G. Wells. The First Men in the Moon. Dover Publications: New York, 2001. p123.

  • February 22, 2008 at 4:00 pm

    features that are clever without being terribly helpful. This
    sounds like something only a hardened tech geek would say,
    but I suspect the feeling has become much more mainstream

    Johnson, Steven. ‘Everything Bad Is Good for You – How popular culture is making us smarter.’ Penguin Books: London, 2006.

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